Thursday, December 20, 2007

See you around

No no, I am not closing blog or doing any such draama for now. :)

When you say "See you around" to someone what do you mean?

I have always used "see you around" for what those words mean: as in, see you around here, in my gtalk window or so. I have been recently enlightened that there is an implication of not wanting to talk to the person too often or trying to "blow one off" by using that phrase.

Really?

15 comments:

ggop said...

Perhaps there is implied vagueness? Come to think of it I do use it when I bump into not so close people.
(Maybe it was said subconscious?)

Sakshi said...

Really?
I use the phrase when dealing with acquaintances not with friends. So it could just be more informal way to say - see you around but hopefully not to soon :P

The_Girl_From_Ipanema said...

ggop, sakshi,
hmmm..so there is something to it then...

Anonymous said...

I always assume that everyone loves me to bits until I am explicitly told to f*** off.

See you around! :)

The_Girl_From_Ipanema said...

LOL @ anonymous. I wish everyone had that attitude. :)

GettingThereNow said...

no. REALLY??

I have said it to almost everyone in my office at one point in time or other. Hmmmm. That would explain the hostile stares and upturned noses. No, I am kidding :P

I thought you say it when you do want to see them again soon. But then I always think people mean what they say. Silly, naive me!

ggop said...

Ha ha! Anon, you are funny.

Raj said...

Well, I say "see you around" only to people I don't always talk to as in the people in the office you bump into once in a while.

The_Girl_From_Ipanema said...

gettingtherenow,
:) hehe. yeah- really- do you really think people mean what they say? :)

raj,
so you also use it selectively, eh? i guess i should watch my words now..

Anonymous said...

Came upon this post as a result when I was about to send an email closed with "see you around", suddenly wondered if what I meant by it was the generally accepted meaning, and googled the phrase to find out.

The recipient is an acquaintance or not-so-close friend; we are in a common social circle so we see each other maybe every few weeks but when we talk it's fairly friendly and sincere. The email was thanking her for looking over a job application, and I used "see you around" to signal that it was factually fairly likely that that I'd see her, maybe or maybe not intentionally, and (hopefully) to imply that I look forward to the occasion. (I did decide to close with the phrase.)

Like GettingThereNow I tend to take people at their word (unless I see a very good reason to think otherwise). The flip-side is that (at least when I am feeling stubborn or impatient ) it annoys me when people don't say what they mean but later expect me to have known what they meant anyway.

- a different anonymous

The_Girl_From_Ipanema said...

different anony,
hmm. i wonder how the person u emailed received it. I think its also a regional thing- see you around has a slightly negative connotation more in the USA, i think.

Anonymous said...

I was also thinking it is for frequent contact, today I knew real sense of word! But how can I know that she also correctly? It might be. Her English is better than mine.

Anonymous said...

Depends on the social context, but in the U.S. "see you around" implies "we may bump into each other but if we do it will not be intentional", in other words "I do NOT really want to see you again".

The negative connotation is not as strong when said to someone you do see on a regular basis, such as a colleague or classmate... but when said to an acquaintance/stranger it is certainly an ironic put-down (unambiguous snub if you don't have each other's contact info).

Anonymous said...

Thats so perpetual with me too.

Unknown said...

Lol when a guy im seeing is too busy and I'm feeling neglected I end with that. Mostly 'see you around... I guess' is what I say to people I'm irritated with. Or hurt by. To be honest it's context and usually if you mean it in a positive way you would say 'hope to see you around'. At least in Idaho...